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Spider Photos - Argiopes 2009

Here's some photos of Argiopes,  mainly from the United States.  In Australia, we call our variety St. Andrew's Cross but in the United States they are more commonly called a Black and Yellow Argiope.  (Argiope aurantia). We have had so many queries and photos sent in of these from people who have never seen them in their area. It's quite incredible!! They are also known as Golden Garden Spiders or just Garden Spider and their scientific name is Argiope aurantia. New page - Black and yellow argiope laying her eggs courtesy of Joe Hollner. Click here for the page and some great shots!!  I also have a couple of fantastic videos sent in by Joe. Video 1 (8,992Kb) Video 2 (16,321Kb)
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Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana    
Argiope Lobata St Andrews Cross Black & Yellow Argiopes
Banded Argiopes Gea Hepatgon/Argiope Appensa Silver Argiopes

BLACK& YELOW ARGIOPE

The number of emails we've had from people in the United States trying to identify the Black and Yellow Argiope or St Andrew's Cross spider (as we call our Australian variety) is quite astounding!!  I've had a lot of questions about where the Argiopes are going to, as some people have noticed that theirs has disappeared. Unfortunately this lovely spider only has a short life span and once she has produced one or more (usually no more than 3) brown, papery egg sacs, she will die. The egg sacs are roughly round in shape and up to 25 mm in diameter; each contains 300 to 1400 eggs. She attaches her egg sacs to one side of her web, close to her resting position at the centre. Each female will watch over her eggs as long as she can, but will die in the first hard frost, if not before. The eggs hatch in Autumn ( fall), but spiderlings stay in the sac during winter and emerge in spring. (Milne and Milne 1980,Heiber 1992, Faulkner 1999). The St Andrew's Cross Spider doesn't have dangerous venom. Its bite causes a mild local pain. There are also other varieties of Argiopes - The Banded Argiope and Silver Argiope being two that have been sent in frequently. There are links to photos of these and other argiopes below as well.

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23  November, 2009:
Hi, I enjoyed looking through your website, particularly the pictures of the argiope. We live in North Carolina and have thoroughly enjoyed watching an argiope for several months. She has just laid her 4th egg sac, which I understand is not very common. My question is, what should we do in order to avoid having potentially 4,000 spiderlings hatch and enter our house? I realize they wouldn't particularly seek inside because there wouldn't be much food in it, but imagine there would be some that would come in. It would be interesting to see them hatch, however and I wonder if it would be wise to allow them to stay where they are or if we'd regret leaving them. Any ideas? I don't have a great camera, but took a picture of the four egg sacs. Thanks, Heather

Reply: Most of the spiderlings will balloon away or be eaten by predators so I wouldn't worry too much about them coming inside or any over population - glen


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23  November, 2009:
She was hanging from the top of our garage door. Is she poisonous? We live in the Ozarks - should I be afraid - be VERY afraid? Thanks Nancy

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16 November, 2009:
I HOPE YOU CAN USE SOME OF MY PICTURES ON YOUR WEBSITE! MC

Click for a larger view

 

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9  November, 2009:
Hi, I am trying to ID a spider that was crawling up my boot while walking along the Santa Cruz River near Tubac, AZ. Including legs, the spider was about 2" in diameter. Can you help with this? Please feel free to use the photo on your website if it would be helpful. Thanks. Bob

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16 October, 2009:
We found this spider just below our gutter on our back porch. It is approximately 2" long and has bright yellow markings. Can you identify it? Thanks Sharon J

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14 October, 2009:
Hello, I have had a yellow garden spider in my tomatoes this summer. This is the first time I have observed this spider. She is now gone but I have found two egg sacs. Would one female have two sacs or did I have two spiders, each building an egg sac? I will attach pictures so you know the kind of spider I had. Thanks, Charlene

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11 October, 2009:
We found this spider in our back yard in Pittsburgh/Bon Air, PA. 15210. You web site helped us identify it. Certainly fits for the 'City of Champions', 2009 Superbowl Champs and 2009 Stanley Cup Winners!

Click for a larger view

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29 September, 2009:
Black and Yellow Argiope Pictures

Click for a larger view

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22 September, 2009:
Hi, it's been a long time. But I couldn't resist sending along the argiope from Oklahoma. Ellen

Click for a larger view

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Reply: I'd say its the same spider only smaller because she has laid her eggs sac. - glen
22 September, 2009:
Hi Again, I hope I am not bothering you too much with all this. I told you that Agatha had gone a few days ago, and to my surprise I awoke this morning and there was another female yellow garden spider in her web in the middle where her spot was. I have a gut feeling and know this is not my Aggie, but a new female. Her abdomen is much smaller and she is just a bit smaller the Aggie was. Would another female garden spider cause harm to another females eggs? Would she eat them or kill them? I am attaching some photos of the new female. I have a few of Aggie but they are not that good. I am also sending a couple pictures of our surroundings which are prime ground for these girls I think. I greatly appreciate your help in all this. As this is my "first" spiderling care. Thank you. Adrianne

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22 September, 2009:
He/She is eating a small worm. The spider is probably around 3 inches. Found in Greenville, SC. Anyone can feel free to use my photo. Thanks!

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12 September, 2009:
I used your site to identify a couple spiders, so I thought you might want to use the pictures I took to help identify them.  Your site is an awesome reference. Thanks! Andy

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8 September, 2009:
Great pick of Black & Yellow Argiope

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Reply: This is a black and yellow argiope and fairly common - glen

8 September, 2009:
We discovered this spider yesterday on the west side of my home and think it is lovely. Thank you for your web site helping us to identify it. We are going to continue to study it. It is a Black and Yellow Argiope Spider that is over an inch long. Mary Grand Rapids, MI

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Reply: This is a black and yellow argiope and fairly common - glen

5 September, 2009:
Hello Glen: Just thought I'd send along a picture of a spider my son took in Huntsville, Alabama this evening. Please feel free to add it to your site. I really appreciate the information you provide. I think this is just an average garden variety spider. Let me know if you think differently. JimP

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Reply: Good on you for telling the pest guy to stay away!! It is a black and yellow argiope and it is not dangerous - glen

3 September, 2009:
I am assuming this is some type of orbweaver, but I have never seen one this large or in these colors. I have told my pest control guy to stay away from him/her. This spider has an orb web and two net webs nearby. Can you identify for me? Thanks! Cindy Davenport, Iowa

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28 August, 2009:
Sending photos of my first ever Black & Yellow Argiope. Thanks for the wonderful site to help me ID her. I think I will keep her right where she is so she can have all of the mosquitoes she wants. I am in Central Arkansas. Judy

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Reply: It is a black and yellow argiope and it is not dangerous - glen

 

28 August, 2009:
can you tell me what this spider is, and if it is harmful?

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23 August, 2009:
Hello Glen -- This spider was seen in Cooks forest in Western Pennsylvania USA. I am trying to figure out what is classification. I found your sight and it has an abundance of great photographs of spiders. Is it possible for you to tell me or point me to its classification?  Thanks, Tom

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23 August, 2009:
Hi, This is in my horse's barn and I'd like to know what kind it is? Thank You, Lisa
Click for a larger view.

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23 August, 2009:
hi there just wondering if you would know what kinda spider this is? thanks Shelly

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9 August, 2009:
Found this while Geocaching @ N 33 09.634 W 096 49.315 Black & Yellow Argipoe Spider Was about 3.5" in diameter and stood between me and the cache (GC1EGFM). -- Jeff

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9 August, 2009:
Found this while Geocaching @ N 33 09.634 W 096 49.315 Black & Yellow Argipoe Spider Was about 3.5" in diameter and stood between me and the cache (GC1EGFM). -- Jeff

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6 August, 2009:
Glen, Here is another beautiful spider found in my garden enjoying a grasshopper. She was captivating, I sat there watching her for quite a while before going to get my camera. :) Thanks so much for your site! Jenn

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6 August, 2009:
Good morning, Here are a few pictures of spiders I took in the parking lot at my job. If you could tell me the types of spiders these are that would be cool. Thank you! John
 

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6 August, 2009:
This spider is on a planter on our deck. Can u please help me identify it? We live in southern Indiana. Thanks!!!!

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6 August, 2009:
Hi, We were vacationing in the Outer Banks of North Carolina when we saw this spider above the doorframe outside. It is about three inches long, and at first I didn't think it was real...until it moved. Can you help me identify it? Thanks, Diane

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3 June, 2009:
Hi, I believe this is a black and yellow argiope. Let me know if it is not. You are welcome to post it if you like it. Thanks, jeff
 

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Reply:  Yes it is the under side of a black and yellow argiope!

12 February, 2009:
Can you tell me what kind of spider this is?
 

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7 January, 2009:
Hi, Just thought I would submit a few photos I took, if you want them. One is a garden spider. Bronwyn, Luray, Virginia
 

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