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Spider Photos - Jumping Spiders 2009

Commonly called Jumping spiders, the Salticidae are also affectionately referred to as  Charlies, Herbies or Salties. They are very common around the home and their anthropomorphic nature endears them to most people. The family name is derived from the Latin "salto" which means to dance with pantomimic gestures. This is the largest spider family and includes more than 5000 species worldwide. These spiders are harmless to man although there have been complaints where this comical, engaging animal has been accused of nasty bites. Here's some photos sent in by viewers.

Unidentified Spiders 2016 Unidentified Spiders 2015 Unidentified Spiders 2014
Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012 Unidentified Spiders 2011
Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003 Unidentified Spiders 2002
Unidentified Spiders 2001    
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Dew Drop Spiders Fishing Spiders
Funnel Web (Aus) Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers
Ghost Spider Giant House Spider Golden Orb Weavers
Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders Hacklemesh Weavers
Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders Jewelled Spiders
Jumping Spiders Lace Web  Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Red & Black Spiders Redback Spiders
Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders
Segestria Florentina Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders
Spider Tats Spitting Spiders Steatoda
Tailless Whip Scorpions Tarantulas Tengellid Spiders
Trapdoor Spiders Tree Trunk Spider Two Spined Spiders
Venusta Orchard Spiders Wandering Spiders White Tailed Spiders
Widow Spiders

Wolf Spiders

Woodlouse Hunters
Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders Zoropsis spinimana Zygiella x-notata

JUMPING SPIDERS

Jumping spiders (Salticidae) are the personalities of the spider world. Though generally small in size (up to 12 mm body length), their large eyes, prodigious jumping ability, often brilliant colours and cocky, inquisitive activity make them very appealing. Many are daylight hunters, using their excellent vision to track, stalk and calculate distance, before suddenly leaping on their prey, propelled by their strong back legs. Males are often more strikingly coloured, patterned or adorned with leg or body hair tufts than are females. They use these adornments to impress the females during often elaborate courtship displays. Information - Australian Museum
Please select from my photo pages below.
2015 2013 - 14 2012 2011
2010 2009 2008 2007
2006 2003 - 2005 Phidippus johnsoni Northern Green Jumping Spider
Daring Jumping Spider Peacock Spider Platycryptus  
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10 December, 2009:
Glen, Big fan of your site. I found this guy and cannot figure out what he is. I thought he was a hobo but I am not sure. Thanks Woody

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Reply:  This is a jumping spider - glen

2 December, 2009:

Thanks, Glen – What about this spider? Found under a rock in Wimberley, TX. Thanks! Beth (P.S. Can you ‘reply-all’ when you respond? Thanks! P.P.S. We are a homeschooling family and have LOVED your website! The kids are fascinated with spiders.)

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16 November, 2009:
I HOPE YOU CAN USE SOME OF MY PICTURES ON YOUR WEBSITE! MC

Click for a larger view

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Reply: Great to finally be getting some Aussie spiders!! This is a jumping spider - glen
9 November, 2009:
hi I live in Western Australia and was wandering if you could help identify this spider I found crawling on the wall in my laundry, it was only about 5 mm long but has unusual red and blue markings on its tail. Cheers Rowena

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Reply: This is a jumping spider - glen

14 October, 2009:
Hi, I am attaching a photo of a little guy I found on the blinds in my house. What could it be? I checked out your sight, and possibly a wolf, but ot sure. Could you also email me back incase I don't see the public response!~ Thanks!!~

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8 September, 2009:
hello, i live on vancover island bc, in a very rural area and saw this spider out in my garden eating a wasp. he was there for well over an hour, so i took a photo. i've never seen this type of spider before (just lots of giant house spiders/fishing spiders/ possibly hobo spiders). if you could identify it, that would be great - haven't seen it in any book i have... he was all hairy, but the top of his 'bum' was very shiny. my camera isn't the best. one shot is in the sun, and on in the shade. he had formed a large leaf into almost a funnel with his web, and the previous victim was a dragonfly (about a quarter of is was left, that's how i know) thanks!

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More from Laura Lee - I also found a name for the jumping spider. Bug Guide has several pictures of the same spider here http://bugguide.net/index.php?q=search&keys=metacyrba&search=Search and labeled him as "metacyrba", although there are some great pictures of it there (especially this one) I seem to have been the only one to get pictures of the underside and something in the shot for scale. And thanks for posting those, that's neat. :)

Reply: This looks like a jumping spider - glen
28 August, 2009:
Hi again, remember me? I wrote a few days ago with pictures of a squashed reddish mystery spider, you said it might be a woodlouse hunter. I managed to catch a live one today ... at least I'm pretty sure it's the same, if it is it's a juvenile or of the opposite sex though. I tried my best to get a decent picture, but this one was so small (half the size of the first) my camera was struggling. That's the side of a US quarter in some of the shots to show size. Could it be a jumping spider, and have you seen one before? Again, my photos are free for anyone to use, such as they are. :) Thank you for your time. -Laura Lee

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Reply: This is a jumping spider - glen

23 August, 2009:
Hi,  The other furry grey/beige spider are all over too, especially on the house. I got bit buy one just like it a few weeks ago and while it made shooting pains in the area and made it warm and numb, there was no mark left at all other than a small red dot. Hope you can identify both, i'll be checking the site. Thanks, Scott Hainesport, NJ

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21 August, 2009:
I have to admit that jumping spiders are my favorite. They're so alert and aggressive, and many come in such bright colors. This one was found in my home here in Missouri and I love the coloring. Danna

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17 July, 2009:
Here’s a jumping spider (male, zebra) enjoying a Guinness during a photo shoot; and a brown guy having lunch (provided by me). ;-) meg

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29 June, 2009:
Hi This spider was crawling out of a pile of burnt wood in a fire pit. It was located in South East Michigan in an area that is surrounded by farm-land and woods & ponds. It was pretty big. It looks like a beetle here but it is definitely a spider. You have to zoom in to see it better. Do you know what it is? Thanks. Melissa

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29 June, 2009:
I discovered the very interesting world of spiders last summer  I'm hoping you can help me now identify the one from my kitchen ceiling. One like this if not this very same one has graced the ceiling every summer since I've lived here, never seen it anywhere else in the house. It makes a grey spot about the size of a nickle. Thanks for any help you might provide me. Julie, Plainwell, Michigan
 

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9 June, 2009:
Greetings- I came across your website while trying to identify a little spider that keeps popping up in my house. I live in central North Carolina and this little guy is no bigger than a quarter of an inch. He is very small. He looks almost scorpion-like, although my husband thinks he looks more ant-like. Either way, he is a very unusual looking guy. I caught one and put him in some acetone and tried to take the best pictures to get his markings. With help from supermacro, I think I was able to get a fairly decent image of him to aid in his identification. I figured the guy harmless. I would guess he was a jumping spider because he seems to do that very well. Sorry for the large image file. That one picture was the best at showing its markings, but I forgot to cut down the resolution. The other 2 images are sm
aller in size. Thanks for your help! Megan

Reply: this is a jumping spider Metacyrba genus - glen

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25 January, 2009:
Hi, The subject line says it all. I found this Brown Widow in a seldom-used sink in a shed. Its web mainline was about 4 feet long and led to a graveyard of dead bugs. Not sure if it has the cool eggsack described in Wikipedia [and am not too interested in searching for it]. Thanks to your info', I know to be careful around it. Thanks for the cool site. I teach Biology and was happy to find it. Do you know what species are shown in the other 2 pictures I've attached? (they may be the same type of spider, found on 2 different occasions - both time on my garage wall) jon i san marino high biology

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Reply: I'd say it is a grass spider, would be good to maybe let it go outside which is where they like to be. The first jumper looks like a baby daring jumping spider, it is getting the bright green/blue on its fangs. The other jumper I'm not sure of its exact species - there are thousands of them and I really don't know many except for the daring ones. I'd say he is looking for a way out by jumping around the cage, as hinting spiders they don't like to be caged and it would be good to let him go outside too. As for feeding, they will eat when there's food and go without if there's not. As a general rule if there is food left over then you are feeing it too much, if it's eating it all then that's OK. As for gender that's hard to tell as they don't have the longer pedipalps like other spiders do that tell you it's a male or female. glen
17 January, 2009:
Hi there. I live in Northern Utah and have a number of spiders come inside to visit. We keep the jumpers since we also seem to have Yellow Sacs and Sowbug eaters. I managed to get a few good shots with the macro setting on a digital point and shoot. I know two are jumpers (and one refused to hold still), but I’m not really sure of the big one. I was hoping for an ID there. The first is a grass spider, I think. It made a web on the bathroom counter that kept it off the surface and gave it a hole to hide in behind the GF’s make up case. With legs out, I’d guess it was about 1.5 in (3.5 cm) across. The second one is a jumper, but a tiny one. It was looking a little thin so I gave it some water out my hand, but it wouldn’t hold still for the picture. This little guy was maybe ¼ inch long, if he stretched. Finally, is the big jumper. This one is close to ½ inch long and the pictures don’t really do the colors justice. Currently, he (or she… hoping you can help with that) is in a terrarium on my desk. The Girlfriend found him in the cat’s food bowl, so she rescued him. I’ve been feeding him, but I’d like to get some information on how much food is too much. He’s really big right now. He’s also moulted, but the husk is in a websac right on the point where the lid meets the walls of the cage. The pictures of him are not very good quality, but they are “hell for cute”. It’s almost like he understood and posed for them. I also have a behaviour question. He has been walking around on the sides of the cage and making 2 to 5 “bounces” with his front feet and pedipalps,, then continues again with just the pedipalps for another 2 or 3 times. Thanks for any information you can give on the type of the one from the bathroom, or the gender of the black jumper. Also, feel free to use any of these pictures as you see fit. Bill.

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