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Spider Photos - Huntsman - 2011

Many people are confused by  5 similar looking spiders - the harmless Huntsman, Wolf Spider,  Southern House Spider (Kukulcania), Fishing Spider and  the notorious Brown Recluse.  Occasionally, the Huntsman Spider, Heteropoda venatoria (Linnaeus), is misidentified as a Brown Recluse. However, the colour pattern on the carapace of this species is reversed, with a light median mark on a dark background, and adults of this spider are much larger than a brown recluse. Huntsman spiders are large, long-legged spiders, measuring up to 15 cm across the legs. They are mostly grey to brown, sometimes with banded legs. Many huntsman spiders, especially Delena (the flattest), and including Isopeda, Isopedella and Holconia, have rather flattened bodies adapted for living in narrow spaces under loose bark or rock crevices. This is aided by their legs which, instead of bending vertically in relation to the body, have the joints twisted so that they spread out forwards and laterally in crab-like fashion ("giant crab spiders"). Both Brown (Heteropoda) and Badge (Neosparassus) Huntsman spiders have less flattened bodies. Huntsman spiders, like all spiders, moult in order to grow and often their old skin may be mistaken for the original spider when seen suspended on bark or in the house. The lifespan of most Huntsman species is about two years or more. Predators of Huntsman Spiders include birds and geckoes, Spider Wasps, nematode worms and egg parasites (wasps and flies).

Here's some photos sent in by viewers.  All photos are copyright to their owners and may not be reproduced without permission. Please choose a section.

Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013 Unidentified Spiders 2012
Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010 Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2003
Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001  
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Fishing Spiders Funnel Web (Aus)
Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers Giant House Spider
Golden Orb Weavers Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders
Hacklemesh Weavers Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders
Leaf Curling Spiders Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders
Marbled Orb Weavers Micarathena Mouse Spiders
Mygalomorphs Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders
Parson Spiders Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion
Purseweb Spider Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Trapdoor Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders
Wandering Spiders

White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders
Wolf Spiders Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders
Zoropsis spinimana    

Huntsman spiders are not found in the United States any further north than Southern California. They can not survive but in the most tropical of situations which are hot all year round, or in desert scrubland like the Olios giganteus on my website. That is one thing to consider before labelling a spider from the states as a Huntsman. Most are imported, and fewer than 3 species are common enough to be called native to this country, besides some smaller Olios species, which are found in the southwest (not San Francisco, which is in Northern California). While you may in some rare instance find a huntsman up north, it'll die as soon as season changes occur. - Paul Day

2012 - 2014 2011 2010 2008 - 2009
2007 - 2008  2005 - 2006 2001 - 2004 Badge Huntsman
HUNTSMAN (Unclassified)

Reply: It could be a huntsman - glen
30 October, 2011:
Hi Glen, Iíve been searching sites high and low to identify this spider, and yours is the best I've found. I live at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala part of each year and have seen three of these so far. The spider is very large Ė about 8 inches stem to stern and a much darker brown than other Huntsmen Iíve seen. It has orange highlights on the thorax and a pattern on the abdomen. It does have a beige moustache under the front pair of eyes. A night hunter and a fast mover with no web. It seemed similar to a picture sent to you recently by Melodie from South Africa. Any information much appreciated. Dru from San Marcos La Laguna.

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Reply: I don't think its either, I think it is a huntsman - glen
30 October, 2011:
I think this is a wolf spider, my friend says brown recluse. Which is it? Thanks for your help. ~Monica

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Reply: I think this is a huntsman - glen
30 October, 2011:
Hi. Do you think you could identify this spider for me, it was found in a lodge I was staying at recently in Phakdina, Nepal, Himalayas region. The size of the spider approx 12cm. It looks like it has a bit of damage to one or two of its legs, but that did not stop it (and me) moving quickly. Kind regards Geraldine

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Reply: Could be a huntsman  - glen

22 October, 2011:
I have now had around 7 of these in my home in a span of about a month. They have varied in size but the smallest was a little over an inch in size. They vary in the pattern on their top side, but for the most part all look like this. Can you please help me in identifying what they are and any suggestions as to how to get them removed and not keep showing up in my house!? Thank you, Amy

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Reply: Probably a huntsman from the eye pattern - glen

11 September, 2011:
Glen, This is a pix of a spider that I found hanging outside my bedroom from a web attached to the ceiling about 6 feet down. It seemed very complacent but was still slightly moving. The 8 eyes were so awesome to capture. It wouldnt spread its legs so I took the pic on a table. I live in east central florida. What might he be?

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Reply: Thanks for the ID Mallory - glen
28 August, 2011:
Hello, I was looking through your site, and I think I know what one of the 2011 Unidentified Spiders are. The one from Wendy on June 12, 2011 I believe is a Giant Crab Spider. They are native to Arizona and similar to a Wolf Spider or Tarantula, except they climb walls very well. Here are a couple links I found that tell about them. I also attached a picture of one I found in my house. The one I found had about a 4 inch leg span. Enjoy, Mallory

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26 August, 2011:
we are not supposed to have brown recluse spiders here in san diego, california. but i've seen these spiders here and there. is it a desert recluse? or brown recluse? it was almost 2 inches wide (wtih legs). any comments would be great! thanks so much!

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1 August, 2011:
I have a great tolerance for critters. But this guy was just a bit bigger than Iíve seen in a long time. Was cleaning out the garage and it was on one of the Storage Cabinets I moved away from the wall. Pictures are kind of bad because it was a bit dark and I kept my distance. Suspect a Huntsman ... But never seen one this big. At least it was a good excuse not to finish cleaning the garage! Steve
 Port Charlotte, Florida

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12 July, 2011:
Good afternoon Glenda (from ďacross the pondĒ Ė itís 6 a.m. in the U.S.A.), This is Kathryn and I have ANOTHER ďHuntsman SpiderĒ.  Hello from America, Kathryn

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Reply: This is a huntsman - glen

12 July, 2011:
Found this spider in my house tonight. Could you please help me figure out what it is? From Port Charlotte,FL. Thanks, Chris.

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Reply: This one has been identified as a giant crab spider, a type of huntsman - glen
12 June, 2011:
Hi, do you have any idea what type of spider this is in the attached picture and if it is dangerous? Itís very big, as large as an outstretched hand. Thanks, Wendy

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Reply: This is a banded huntsman - glen

12 June, 2011:
hello , I need some help with this spider if it is possible...I can recognize some smaller spiders around my house through pictures but this one...I can't find any picture, through every site I've searched that is very close to that spider...I'm comfuzed with all those species that look like this spider...I found her slowly going down from my ceiling, hanging from a line of web (like spiderman or something:) ) she's about 5cm in diameter with legs spread and she's very fast. I live in Greece, Europe. I don't know if the photo helps but I can't do better since she moves so fast. thank you and well done for the amazing job on the site. you're truly an expert.

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Reply: This is a huntsman - glen

4 June, 2011:
Any idea what kind of spider this is? It was found on the wall in my house on May 19th, in Dewey Arizona. Thank you, Joy

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Reply: This is a huntsman - glen

19 May, 2011:
Hey was just wondering what kind of spider this is it was found in our jacuzzi next to the jacuzzi is a pile of fire wood we live in Phoenix, Arizona and have kids playing was just hoping its nothing poisoness, thank you.

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Reply: This is a huntsman, often called rain spiders in South Africa - glen

18 May, 2011:
Hello Glen This is the whole gang together that is regularly in and the round the house. We stay on a farm and moved into the house last year the same time as now and the middle guy and a few others the same used to make almost the house as a high way. They would come in by the back door and leave by the front very strange but that is how I figure them out and mostly that will be in the evening. Yesterday while cleaning the study I found this fellow again. The guy at the bottom I think is just a rain spider looking at pictures on your site and others. Regards, Bernette

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Reply: This is a huntsman - glen

18 May, 2011:
Hi Glen, I checked out your website and i still can't fully determine what type of spider i found last night. I looked down and saw this huge thing running across my drive way. Attached is a very clear photo of the spider. I live in Tarpon Springs, FL USA (Near Clearwater, FL). Thank You, Anthony

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Reply: This is a huntsman and they often come up the drains in bathrooms and laundries. They are scary but not dangerous - glen

6 May, 2011:
Hello, I could really use your help. At 9:45 p.m., in my 3rd floor apartment laundry room, in Clearwater, Florida, I found a spider that looks like this: What is it and why was it in my apartment? My apartment is spotless, I donít have any cockroaches or other insects crawling around so why? It was on the wall about 1 inch away from the ceiling. It was between 4 Ė 5 inches across when it was flat. Iíve also attached a photo I took of it next to a ruler to show that it was 2 inches across when it died. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Kathryn

Click for a larger view

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Reply: This is a huntsman - glen

29 April, 2011:
Dear sir I am trying to find out what kind of spider this is and if it is poiseness? I live in South Africa, I am not sure where you are from, I have attached a clear photograph so that you can see what it looks like, can you please assist me in this regard, I have a small baby in the house and is afraid that it might bite him, I do not want to kill the poor spiders if they are harmless. They are quite common in our house I find a lot of them around Please if you could come back to me a.s.a.p.

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Reply: I had never heard of the David Bowie spider but apart from not being as yellow as they appear, it does look like one (these are part of the huntsman family) - glen

6 April, 2011:
hi, is this a Heteropoda davidbowie? greets nik Nikolaus, MA

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Reply: Yes - glen

6 April, 2011:
Huntsman?

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Reply: This is a huntsman spider - glen

6 April, 2011:
Hi, Here's the photo. If you cant identify it don't worry but we are very intrigued!! Many thanks

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Reply: This is a huntsman spider and they aren't dangerous - glen

13 March, 2011:
Hi, This spider with his legs, would fill my whole hand. The body part is about 2 to 3 cmís long I live in Pretoria, South Africa. It is still alive, I will try and chase it outside. Could you tell me what it is and if it is maybe poisonous? Thanks Melodie

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Reply: Yes, this one looks likes a badge huntsman spider and they aren't dangerous - glen

13 January, 2011:
Hello! We just came back from a camping trip in southern NSW, and found this freeloader in our dirty laundry ;) Photos attached. Can you please help identify? Should he be released? We've scoured the net but we can't find his friends. The tiny white dot on his bum is actually one of the crumbs from the jar. We thought "Ooohh, white-tail!", but it later fell off :) Notable markings are black tail tip, two black dots on its carapace, black/yellow alternating segment legs and anything else you can see that we can't :) :) Thank you! :) Miki

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