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Spider Photos - Wolf Spiders

Here's some photos sent in by viewers. Wolf Spiders are large, hairy spiders which are usually patterned with a mixture of black, gray, and brown.  Wolf spiders, especially large ones, look very similar to spiders in the Pisauridae family (nursery web and fishing spiders), but wolf spiders are usually more robust, with shorter legs. There are more than 2000 wolf spider species. Wolf spiders have 8 eyes.  As with all spiders, wolf spiders have 8 legs, 2 body parts (cephalothorax and abdomen), and fang-like mouthparts called "chelicerae."  Like all spiders, young wolf spiders hatch from eggs and look like tiny adults.  They shed their skin as they grow.  Most wolf spiders live for several years.  In many species, female wolf spiders lay dozens of eggs at one time and wrap them in a large ball of web.  The female will then carry  the egg sac with them until the spiderlings hatch.  The gestation period is 9 to 27 days depending on the surrounding temperature and species of wolf spider. Upon hatching the, spiderlings will live on the mother's back for a few weeks until they are large enough to hunt on their own. Wolf spiders are active hunters that patrol the ground for insects, other spiders, and similar creatures.  They do not use webs to capture prey.  They live by the thousands in leaf litter and grassy areas.  Some wolf spiders build small burrows and defend a territory, others are free-roaming.  Because they are so numerous, and such voracious predators, wolf spiders are a very important part of any ecosystem in which they occur. Wolf spiders are not normally pests, but they often wander into homes.  They can bite, but they are not considered dangerous.  Wolf spiders look similar to brown recluses, and are often killed because they resemble these dangerous spiders.  With a little practice, it is easy to tell the difference between wolf spiders and brown recluses. There are several types of wolf spiders and I have tried to group them accordingly below. All photos are copyright to their owners and may not be reproduced without permission. Please choose a section.

Unidentified Spiders 2015 Unidentified Spiders 2014 Unidentified Spiders 2013
Unidentified Spiders 2012 Unidentified Spiders 2011 Unidentified Spiders 2010
Unidentified Spiders 2009 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2009 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2008 (1)
Unidentified Spiders 2008 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2007 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2007 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2006 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2006 (3) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (2) Unidentified Spiders 2005 (3)
Unidentified Spiders 2005 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2003 Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001
Spiders in Amber Closeups Ant & Wasp Mimicking Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Barn Funnel Weaving Spider Basilica  Spiders
Bird Dropping Spiders Black House Spiders Bolas Spiders
Brown Recluse Spiders Candy Stripe Spiders Common House Spider
Crab Spiders Cyclosa Conica Daddy Long Legs
Daring Jumping Spiders Dew Drop Spiders Fishing Spiders
Funnel Web (Aus) Furrow Spider Garden Orb Weavers
Ghost Spider Giant House Spider Golden Orb Weavers
Grass spiders/Funnel Weavers Ground Spiders Hacklemesh Weavers
Hobo Spiders Huntsman Spiders Jewelled Spiders
Jumping Spiders Ladybird Spiders Leaf Curling Spiders
Long Jawed Orb Weavers Lynx Spiders Marbled Orb Weavers
Micarathena Mouse Spiders Mygalomorphs
Net casting Spider Nursery Web Spiders Parson Spiders
Pirate Spiders Pseudoscorpion Purseweb Spider
Red & Black Spiders Redback Spiders Red Spotted Ant Mimic Spiders
Running Crab Spiders Scorpion Spiders Segestria Florentina
Solfugids/Camel Spiders Southern House Spiders Spider Tats
Spitting Spiders Steatoda Tailless Whip Scorpions
Tarantulas Tengellid Spiders Trapdoor Spiders
Two Spined Spiders Venusta Orchard Spiders Wandering Spiders
White Tailed Spiders

Widow Spiders

Wolf Spiders
Woodlouse Hunters Yellow & Broad faced Sac Spiders Zoropsis spinimana
Other Wolf spiders (1) Other Wolf spiders (2) Other Wolf spiders (3)
Other Wolf spiders (4) Other Wolf spiders (5) Other Wolf spiders (6)
Other Wolf spiders (7) Other Wolf spiders (8) Other Wolf spiders (9)
Carolina Wolf Spiders Rabid Wolf Spiders Burrowing Wolf Spiders

OTHER WOLF SPIDERS (1)

The surest way to recognize a wolf spider is by the general stout body shape, the eye arrangement and by the fact that they are usually not in a web. Their general body shape is somewhat stout with the cephalothorax and abdomen of about equal sizes. The legs also are stout, fairly even in length and strong enough to support the spiders weight. The legs can be compared to those of many web building spiders whose legs are much longer and thinner. In wolf spiders, the anterior eyes are made up of 4 small eyes in a row, and the posterior eyes are 4 large eyes arranged in two rows. From a front view, you can see a row of 4 small anterior eyes with two larger eyes above them and 2 eyes further back on the head. The large eyes are significant in their behaviour: wolf spiders do have good eyesight (especially for spiders) and use vision fairly extensively for prey capture, courtship and aggressive interactions. The posterior eyes give the spiders vision above them and behind them and are significant in avoiding predation or capture.

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5 February, 2015
Spider i found in my living room. Not aggressive, just wanted to run away. Probably between 3-4cm long, the cup's diameter is 8cm. I live in Buenos Aires.

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5 February, 2015
Good day We live in limpopo south africa and found this spider in my garden I think its either a wolf spider or a female ladybird spider not sure My mom said it looks like a barkspider? Please help Thank you

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5 February, 2015
This was in my friend's garden. Can you ID it please?

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5 February, 2015
Is this a Wolf Spider? I live in SE Kansas (Labette County)

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5 February, 2015
What kinda Spider is this?

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5 February, 2015
Iím assuming your name is Glen because of your email address I live in northern new Hampshire in the White Mountains. This spider (attached photo, the lighter is for size comparison ) was walking across my yard. Donít worry I protected it from the men in my house who wanted to kill it. I relocated it. What kind of spider is it? Pamela

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5 February, 2015
Can you identify please.. south central Pennsylvania spider. thanks Connie

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5 February, 2015
Hi, Glen. New to the page, but a big fan. My son and I love looking at the spiders here near the Poconos in PA, USA. Can you help us be sure if this is a wolf? Much obliged for your time. Bill & Cameron

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5 February, 2015
beautiful wolf spider I caught a week ago...

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5 February, 2015
I was supposed to be watching a tree being trimmed, I was more taken by this youngster by my feet. .

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5 February, 2015
I found this spider crawling on my living room floor which was quite alarming considering the size can you help in identifying this spider.

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5 February, 2015
This is a big guy from Southern Colorado. Pretty aggressive and actually more grey than he looks in the picture. Thanks!

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4 February, 2015
Hi. I live on the bass coast of Victoria and was wondering what type of friend this may be. I love spiders and this is carrying its young. Thanks for your time. Steve.

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4 February, 2015
Hi Glen - I have been trying to identify a spider I saw on a hike in Corcovado National Park, Costa Rica. I believe it is a wolf spider, but wanted to try to verify. Attached is a picture (higher resolution available if needed). Thanks in advance and happy holidays. Adam

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Reply: We are pretty sure its a wolf spider: Hoggicosa storri formerly known as Lycosa Storri - Australian wolfspider I believe - Mike

4 February, 2015
Hi I live in Western Australia and this little fellow who was very aggressive pop out from under my freezer. Iíve looked at every photo I can find but I cannot find a good match. Any ideas? Cheers Mike

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Click here for Page 2 of Wolf Spider photos.

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