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Spider Photos - Ladybird Spiders

Ladybird spiders belong to the Eresus species which is a genus of velvet spiders comprising several species, including Eresus cinnaberinus (formerly E. niger) and Eresus sandaliatus, both of which are sometimes known as the "Ladybird spider". (Info: Wikipedia)

Eresus cinnaberinus (formerly Eresus niger) is native to Europe. The taxon "Eresus cinnaberinus" is considered a nomen dubium, the specimens having been divided into the species E. kollari, E. sandaliatus and E. moravicus. The three species differ in size, color pattern, shape of prosoma and copulatory organs, and habitat, with no morphologically intermediate forms. As eastern and western E. kollari are genetically different, with the eastern form likely a hybrid between "pure" E. kollari and E. moravicus, it is possible that later revisions will partition it into additional species.

Males are up to 11 mm long, females can reach up to 20 millimetres (0.79 in). Males have a black prosoma and a strikingly red opisthosoma with four black dots (sometimes with white lining), resembling a ladybug (or ladybird). The black legs have white stripes, the hind legs are partly red. Females are black with some white hairs, only the front is sometimes yellow.
This species can be found only in a "secret" half-acre patch of south-facing Dorset heathland in England. It prefers sunny, dry locations and is widely distributed in Central and Southern Europe.

These spiders live in up to 10 centimetres (3.9 in) long underground tubes with a diameter of about one centimetre. On top they are much wider and lined with cribellate silk. Many webs can usually be found in the same place, sometimes up to ten on a single square meter. E. cinnaberinus mainly catches millipedes and beetles. Males walk around during September, searching for females. If it finds one, it lives with the female in her tube, and they feed from the same web.

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LADYBIRD SPIDER

Reply: Probably  a female ladybird spider - glen

8 February, 2016:
??

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Reply: Some sort of myglamorph, maybe  a female ladybird spider - glen

27 July, 2015:
Hi This was found in a garden in Portugal. Any ideas? Thanks x

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Reply: This looks like  a female ladybird spider - glen

19 September, 2014:
Hi Found this spider. Can u help me identify

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Reply: This could be female ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) - glen

6 July, 2014:
Hi Glen. On holiday in Greece and have seen the attached. Any ideas who she is? Robin

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Reply: This is a male ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) - glen

14 June, 2014:
Hi there My name is Alexander and I'm from Greece. I've come across a species of spider that I'm having trouble finding information about, a friend suggested you and here I am. Being a tarantula pet owner I was fascinated by its colours, its size and its aggressive demeanor. It's about 2 inches ( huge for my countries standards) and its growth rate is fast suggesting it reaches a considerable size. I really really would appreciate any help and I would be forever I'm your dept. Thank you in advance Sincerely yours Alexander

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Reply: This is a female ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) - glen

24 October, 2013:
Hello, can you recognize this spider and is it dangerous? We found it on a beach at the Black Sea in Bulgaria. Thank you in advance!

 

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Reply: This is a female ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) - glen

24 October, 2013:
Hi Glen Found this little guy in a woodpile outside. We are from the west coast of South Africa, a few hours north of Cape Town. Thanks for a great site.

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Reply: This is a male ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) and is protected in some places. The males have the beautiful colouring.

28 November, 2012:
I have just seen this while camping should I be afraid please, I can't find it anywhere . We are in Greece.

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Reply: This is a female ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) and is protected in some places. The males have the beautiful colouring.

28 November, 2012:
These are pictures of a spider we found in Baghdad Iraq while deployed there in 2004. I was wondering if you could tell me what it is and if it is poisonous. Thanks

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Reply: This is a female ladybird spider too - glen

12 September, 2011:
We saw this spider in our garden in south east Bulgaria, but dont know what it is, or if it is poisonous. Any help would be appreciated regards Pat

Click for a larger view

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Reply: This is a female ladybird spider - glen

1 August, 2011:
Hi, Not sure if you can help me with this one. I live in Spain (Alicante, Valencia) and recently had a visit from this robust little chap in the photos attached. I say little, but really it was big enough to be seen. Unlike other spiders I noted it was very clumsy not at all agile probably to do with its small stumpy legs. Could you identify it for me as I can not find anyone local to do so, even the web dedicated to Spanish wildlife could not help. Regards K, Spain

Click for a larger view

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Reply: This is a female ladybird spider- glen

19 June, 2011:
Hanging around on the Davesgarden.com insect and spider identification forum, a person from Monemvasia, Greece, said their friend had captured a spider, and posted pictures. It's a beautiful specimen, and though I've been able to find one more photo of it on Google, we haven't been able to identify it. Hoping you might be able to shed some light for us! Thank you! Ashley

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Reply: This is a male ladybird spider (Eresus cinnaberinus) and is protected in some places. The males have the beautiful colouring.

30 September, 2005:
These are pictures of a spider we found in Baghdad Iraq while deployed there in 2004. I was wondering if you could tell me what it is and if it is poisonous. Thanks

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